Kiva Camino Gummies

 
 
Kiva’s Camino gummies come in four flavors and experiences. Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/ Surfacehaus . Props:  Jay Jeffers/The Store .

Kiva’s Camino gummies come in four flavors and experiences. Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/Surfacehaus. Props: Jay Jeffers/The Store.

 
 
 

THC gummies are right up there with brownies in terms of classic edible forms, but we’ve come a long way, baby. Kiva Confections, known for their famed Terra Bites and Petra Mints (a microdoser favorite), have released a special line of gummies called Camino. The name pays homage to California’s El Camino Real, which stretches through The Golden State for 600 miles, and each of the four flavors is meant to evoke a certain place and landscape, from the desert to the coast. They also reference our local produce as well, like the balanced Blenheim Apricot flavor (with a touch of lime).


These are built for low-dose users, since each gummy ranges from 2mg to 5mg (and are easy to cut in half), and one even has some CBD in the mix. Another thing that was added to each of the four flavor profiles was a specific combo of plant-based terpenes, designed to help build a certain effect, from energizing to chilling. 

The Camino Blenheim Apricot gummy (balanced). Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/ Surfacehaus . Props:  Jay Jeffers/The Store .

The Camino Blenheim Apricot gummy (balanced). Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/Surfacehaus. Props: Jay Jeffers/The Store.

Terpenes can be found in plants, fruits (often in the rind), flowers, and herbs—and cannabis. Terpenes are what gives different cannabis cultivars their many fragrance notes, from piney to citrusy, and they are also what help drive the effects. (Just think about how relaxed you feel when you take a sniff of lavender.) 


While some folks may think it’s all about indica vs. sativa, it’s really about the terps. So the uplifting effects from the famed sativa Jack Herer are due more to its terpene profile, typically including Pinene and Limonene (which can also be found in other energizing sativas). Terpenes may also play a part in the medical benefits of cannabis, from being anti-inflammatory to helping with depression or insomnia. 


Kiva is using a customized mix of different plant-based terpenes for Camino, like Limonene, Beta-Caryophyllene, Linalool, and Pinene in their uplifting Pineapple Habanero gummy, while the chill Wild Berry features Beta-Caryophyllene, Linalool, Myrcene, Humulene, and Terpineol for a more relaxing, indica-like effect. It even tastes soothing, while that Pineapple Habanero tastes like a party. Kiva reportedly spent over two years developing Camino’s flavors, terpene blends, and effects.

Camino Pineapple Habanero (uplifting). Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/ Surfacehaus . Props:  Jay Jeffers/The Store .

Camino Pineapple Habanero (uplifting). Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/Surfacehaus. Props: Jay Jeffers/The Store.

But here’s the thing (for me at least): I really can’t tell much of a difference in effects between the four kinds, I just feel a nice canna-buzz in my body (and brain) with all of them. Maybe at my preferred 2.5mg low-dose, it doesn’t make that much of a difference? I dunno. I even took 5mg of an uplifting Pineapple Habanero one evening for the sake of experimentation, and a couple hours later, I was as sleepy as I ever am when I take a larger dose (for me, anyway) of an edible in the evening. 


The social Sparkling Pear (with 2mg of THC and 6mg of CBD) had me slightly drowsy an hour after consuming it one afternoon—but then I went for a walk and totally veered into the perky zone. One thing I did notice is the lifted effects from the uplifting Pineapple Habanero were more pronounced than when I consumed the balanced Blenheim Apricot, so there’s that. Maybe you can just play the game of psychosomatic powers and believe the chill Wild Berry (with blackberry and raspberry and indica terpenes) is gonna make you chill. I say, go for the flavor that sounds good to you and enjoy it.

Camino Wild Berry (chill). Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/ Surfacehaus . Props:  Jay Jeffers/The Store .

Camino Wild Berry (chill). Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/Surfacehaus. Props: Jay Jeffers/The Store.

They definitely taste good, and I’m not much of a candy lover. They have bright, fruity flavors that taste natural. No nasty high-fructose corn syrup in these babies—Kiva uses organic tapioca syrup, sugar, and gelatin (FYI, vegetarians and vegans!). They have a softer, chewy texture, and are very easy to cut in half if a smaller dose is desired.


How I like to use Camino

I have already mentioned before in mymilligram how much I enjoy cannabis with exercise, and as an avid walker, Camino gummies are built for my 90-minute power walks in the park and at the beach. I often put on some bumping house music, but I also enjoy listening to podcasts—perfect to listen to and absorb more when you’re a little lifted. Weekend chilling at home, going to the movies, or before going out to dinner, also good.


If you’re new to taking cannabis or are sensitive to THC, I recommend starting with the social Sparkling Pear—they’re just 2mg of THC and 6mg of CBD per gummy, so you can eat the entire thing. (The other three flavors are 5mg each, so just cut one in half.) 

Camino Sparkling Pear. Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/ Surfacehaus . Props:  Jay Jeffers/The Store .

Camino Sparkling Pear. Photo: Marcia Gagliardi. © mymilligram. Styling: Christian Jusinski/Surfacehaus. Props: Jay Jeffers/The Store.

Psychoactive feelings typically begin for people around 2mg–2.5mg, but edibles can register slightly stronger than, say, a sublingual or inhaled route of administration because of the way your body will digest, metabolize, and convert the THC (delta-9-THC, to be exact) into 11-hydroxy-THC (which is known for even stronger psychoactive effects than THC). The effects from an edible also last longer, which can be a benefit if you just want a cruising altitude for a while (also great for sleep, or if you’re seeking relief from pain). I always recommend starting low and going slow, but especially with edibles.


After ingesting, usually about 45 minutes later, I feel a little lift, and may pay a bit of extra attention to things around me (nature, music, people, colors, smells), and feel a gentle buzz in my body. I can get a little spacey or even giggly. About an hour later is when I like to put my shoes on and go for my walk. (I usually just wait for a full smile to show up on my face and then it’s go time.) Depending upon what and when I have eaten, I’ve also had effects come on in 30 minutes, or take 90 minutes to fully blossom.


Edibles can take up to two hours to kick in, so allow time for a delayed onset, and don’t take more. (Save the upgrade for another day.) I’ll feel the effects from 2.5mg for at least a few hours—and it’s a gentle comedown. For me, there’s a time and place for an edible’s longer endurance, so if you want a light buzz to last for a bit, like at a show or playing with kids in the park all day, give ’em a whirl. Edibles are also good to experiment with in the evening at home—see if they relax you before bedtime. Sweet dreams!


Visit kivaconfections.com for more info and the mymilligram page on getsava.com to purchase Camino!

 

 

Disclaimer: The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Please consult your healthcare professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product.